H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

Time didn’t run forwards any more. It was a solid thing you could press yourself against and feel it push back; a thick fluid, half-air, half-glass, that flowed both ways and sent ripples of recollection forwards and new events backwards so that new things I encountered, then, seemed souvenirs from the distant past. (pg. 16, Jonathan Cape)

H is for Hawk is one of those rare books that come along every so often that have the potential to resonate with many readers, perhaps even changing their outlook on life in some small way. An ingenious blend of memoir and nature writing, an intelligent, multi-layered and humane work, H is for Hawk is one of my favourite books of the year.

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When Helen Macdonald, a Cambridge historian, writer and illustrator, loses her father to a heart attack, she is devastated. Throughout her life, she has looked up to her dad with the two Macdonalds sharing several qualities and personality traits. Helen, a watcher by nature, is fascinated by birds of prey and an experienced trainer of falcons. Her father, a press photographer by profession, grew up watching birds of a different kind. By spending his childhood spotting and recording details of planes, he honed the observational skills and patience that would serve him well in his future career as a photojournalist.

Broken by grief and a deep sense of emptiness, Helen Macdonald latches on to the one passion she believes may help her fill the void left by the loss of her father: a quest to raise and train a young goshawk. Despite her vast experience with falcons, this endeavour represents quite a challenge for Macdonald as goshawks come with a reputation for being notoriously difficult to tame. Nevertheless, she presses ahead and takes delivery of the bird on a Scottish quayside for £800 in twenty-pound notes in a scene that she readily admits feels ‘like a drugs deal.’

When she arrives back in Cambridge, Macdonald fills the freezer with hawk food, unplugs the phone and begins the process of bonding with the hawk whom she names Mabel. (The name derives from the Latin ‘amabilis,’ meaning ‘lovable’, or ‘dear.’) It’s an intense process, one that requires great patience, delicacy and solitude, and in an effort to gain Mabel’s trust, there is a sense that Macdonald must make herself seem invisible. Only once Mabel is focused on eating can Macdonald remind the bird of her presence. As long as she takes it slowly, very slowly indeed, the decisive moment will come:

Regarding the room with simple curiosity, she turned her head and saw me. And jumped. Jumped exactly like a human in surprise. I felt the scratch of her talons and her shock, too, cold and electric. That was the moment. Until a minute ago I was so terrifying I was all that existed. But then she had forgotten me. Only for a fraction of a second, but it was enough. The forgetting was delightful because it was a sign that the hawk was stating to accept me. But there was a deeper, darker thrill. It was that I had been forgotten (pg. 73)

On one level, H is for Hawk is the story of how Macdonald chooses to deal with the process of bereavement by training a goshawk. There is a sense that she is trying to rebuild herself by investing her energy and love in the hawk. A deep relationship develops as she watches Mabel (like a hawk!) and becomes attuned to the smallest of cues and changes in the bird’s posture, feathers and eye movements. All of these actions act as signals thereby enabling Helen to read and anticipate the bird’s mood. As the days pass, Mabel comes to represent everything Macdonald wishes to be, self-assured and released from the weight of grief:

I’d flown scores of hawks, and every step of their training was familiar to me. But while the steps were familiar, the person taking them was not. I was in ruins. Some deep part of me was trying to rebuild itself, and its model was right there on my fist. The hawk was everything I wanted to be: solitary, self-possessed, free from grief, and numb to the hurts of human life.

I was turning into a hawk. (pg. 85)

When the time comes to take her hawk outside (and unhooded) for the first time, Macdonald also appears to be seeing the world afresh as if she is viewing everything through Mabel’s eyes. We follow Helen as she introduces Mabel to a new environment and teaches her to take flight, an activity that emphasises the bird’s capacity for living in the present moment, something Macdonald wishes she could mirror.

H is for Hawk is a multi-layered book, and alongside her quest to train Mabel, Macdonald reflects on the life of T.H. White, author of the Arthurian novels, The Once and Future King. White also penned The Goshawk, a book that captured his own attempts – ill-judged in this instance – to tame and train a young German goshawk named Gos. It’s a text that Macdonald read as a young girl with a developing interest in birds. This could have been jarring, but she skilfully weaves these observations on White’s troubled existence (and passages of White’s writing) alongside her own story to form a richly textured and connected narrative.

In an attempt to suppress his homosexuality, White had tried to conform to the conventional rules of society at the time, to fit in with everyone else, but to no avail. His years as a schoolmaster at Stowe and a fear of war had pushed him to breaking point, and he saw Gos as the living embodiment of all the dark desires he had tried to repress for years:

He had refused humanity in favour of hawks, but he could not escape himself. Once again White was engaged in a battle to civilise the perversity and unruliness within himself. Only now he had put those things in the hawk, and he was trying to civilise them there. He found himself in a strange, locked battle with a bird that was all the things he longed for, but had always fought against. It was a terrible paradox. A proper tragedy. No wonder living with Gos brought him nearly to madness. (pg. 80)

Throughout the course of H is for Hawk, we also learn a great deal about hawks, the history, heritage and myths surrounding falconry, and a sprinkling of the terminology used to describe goshawks. For instance, we discover how a hawk will ‘bate’ by exhibiting ‘a headlong dive of rage and terror’ as it leaps from the fist or perch in wild bid for freedom; how a goshawk in a state of readiness to hunt is in ‘yarak’; how its prey is termed ‘quarry.’

The writing is excellent: vivid and evocative in its description of landscape and nature, informative and engaging on falconry and White. Ultimately though, it is Macdonald’s relationship with Mabel which forms the beating heart of this book. Once the bird takes flight, the sense of relief Helen feels when Mabel returns to her fist is like a balm, something to help ease the pain of grief.

Those of you who know me well may realise I had to pick the right moment to read H is for Hawk – I’ve wanted to read it for months, but I knew it would be an emotional read for me. Here’s the thing…both my parents died suddenly: my father when I was eleven, my mother fifteen years later. I can’t recall much about the years following my father’s death (there was school to deal with), but I was in a very dark place for a year two after my mother died of a brain haemorrhage. I’m not saying that training a hawk would have helped me to cope with my own grief crisis, but I can relate to Helen’s need to have a focal point in her life. Something to help her through that period when she probably felt numb and gripped by a strange kind of madness (she talks about this in the book). I think this is why H is for Hawk resonated so strongly with me as I could relate parts of it to my own life experience. 

Irrespective of this, H is for Hawk is a wonderful book, and I’m glad I finally found the right time to read it. I’d like to finish on an upbeat note, so here’s a passage on Mabel at the height of her powers in flight:

I let her go. Her tactical sense is magnificent. She drops from the fist, and sets off, no higher than a hand’s width above the ground, using every inch of the undulating relief as cover, gathering speed until the frosty stubble winks and flashes under her, and she curves over the top of the hill. Then she sets her wings and glides, using gravity and momentum to race downhill, flash up over the top of the hedge in a sudden flowering of cream and white, a good hundred yards away, and then continue down the hedge’s far side, invisible to me. I’m running, all this time, my feet caked with mud, feeling earthbound but transported at the same time. (pgs. 234 – 5)

Claire at Word by Word, Naomi at The Writes of Women, Belinda at Bii’s Books and Eric at Lonesome Reader have also reviewed (and loved) this book.

H is for Hawk is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape. Source: personal copy.

55 thoughts on “H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

  1. MarinaSofia

    I’m glad you found the mental space you needed to read and love this book. It sounds a little bit like the Little Prince and his attempts to tame the Fox – but for grown-ups. I’m trying to find the right moment to read it as well.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Marina. Yes, it is a bit like The Little Prince although it’s so long since I read that book I can barely recall it!

      H is for Hawk is wonderful, and I’d definitely recommend it, but timing is everything with a book like this. I have Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking to read, and that’s another one where I’ll need to pick an appropriate time.

      Reply
  2. naomifrisby

    I’m so glad you enjoyed the book, Jacqui. I agree with everything you’ve said about it. Thanks also for the link.

    My goodness, your parents’ deaths, what a thing to go through at such young ages x

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Naomi, and you’re very welcome. I’m glad I found the right time to read this book. As I think you were aware, I’d been trying to avoid reading it at a time that would coincide with birthdays and anniversaries and the back of this year was a good option in the end.

      My parents – yes, it all seems such a long time ago now, but two or three scenes (the memorial service, for example) brought it all back to me.

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      It’s a beautiful book, quite difficult to describe in some ways as the blend is so unusual and yes, very moving. Let me know how you get on if you do decide to read it, I’d love to hear what you think.

      Reply
  3. susanosborne55

    A very fine, review, Jacqui. I’m sure this can’t have been an easy book to read or to write about for you. Losing a parent when young leaves an indelible mark, I know, but losing two is hard for the rest of us to imagine. I’ve been wondering about this book for a while but I think I must read it now.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Susan. It’s such a beautiful book, and the experience of reading it was quite cathartic even if it did stir some memories. Funnily enough, I read it at the end of October but wanted to mull it over for a while before writing this post. And then German Lit Month took over, so I sat on it for a few weeks! I’d love to know what you think of the book should you decide to read it.

      Reply
  4. kaggsysbookishramblings

    Sometimes you relate to books on a deeply personal level and it makes them even more special. It sounds as if this was just the right book for you and at just the right time.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, I think you’re right, Karen. Goshawks aside, there’s so much here that resonates with my own experience, but others may feel very differently about this book. The back end of this year was the right time for me for a variety of reasons.

      Reply
  5. Col

    I really enjoyed your review. I’ve read many many good things about this book and I’m certainly keen to read it – but I’m in the opposite place to you that doing so now wouldn’t be a good time for me. But I will buy and keep it on the shelf till I think I’m ready.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Col. I would recommend this book, but the time has to be right and that’s going to vary from person to person. An emotional read for sure, but a very worthwhile and rewarding one. I hope you’re okay.

      Reply
  6. Brian Joseph

    Making such a personal connection with a book can be such an important experience. Your experience comes out in this commentary Jacqui.

    I do understand the connection with animals and the natural world in relation to finding healing and peace. The challenge of training a hawk seems to fit right into this.

    This does sound like a great book.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Brian, and I’m glad you felt that came across in my commentary. I dithered over whether to include the background about my parents, but decided to go with it in the end as it was so fundamental in framing my response to this book.

      You’re right, there is something healing about connecting with nature and landscape and Macdonald writes very vividly about her/our relationship with the natural world. It’s a beautiful book, very thought-provoking: the kind of reading experience that prompts you to reflect on aspects of your own life.

      Reply
  7. litlove

    Wonderful review of a book I am looking forward a great deal to reading. I’m glad you found the right time and place to read it, and that Macdonald’s memoir was sensitive enough in its writing to hold you to it. How difficult to lose both parents with no warning. But you are welcome to my mother, if you like!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many thanks. I think Macdonald gets the balance just right here. She reveals enough for it to feel very personal, almost as though she’s confiding in you (and you alone), but it never feels sentimental or mawkish in any way. I really hope you enjoy it.

      Your last comment made me laugh – you’re not the first person to offer to loan me their mother!

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, I’m so glad to hear you’re enjoying it! I completely agree with you about the tone. It never feels overly sentimental or self-indulgent in any way, and that’s quite a skill to pull off.

      Reply
  8. realthog

    What a very excellent essay. This isn’t a book that, left to my own devices, I’d ever have thought to read, but you make it sound so wonderful that I’m now tempted!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, John. It is a very unusual blend, but it really works. It’s been quite a hit over here, and it won the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction last month. Not that prizes are everything, but it feels well-deserved in this case. I’d recommend it, especially if you’re interested in nature or birds.

      Reply
  9. Bellezza

    First, Jacqui, a hug and a kiss to you for your strength at the loss of both of your parents. I admire your courage and strength, for you did have a choice to be strong or give in to sorrow such that it swallowed you whole. Not that it didn’t for awhile. I’m not sure how to have the courage required when this happens to me, and it seems very close to happening with my father’s weak heart.

    I liked this line in your post: “As the days pass, Mabel comes to represent everything Macdonald wishes to be, self-assured and released from the weight of grief.” How wonderful to find a healing outlet, and a connection to her father, in the training of this bird. I am immediately caught up in the story, and I can easily see what a fascinating book this would be. God’s creatures are so intriguing, so mighty, so comforting to us.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Bellezza. Yes, my mother’s death threw me right off course for a year, maybe more, but happily many years have passed since then. I’m so sorry to hear of your father’s illness, and I hope you find a way to navigate the months and years to come. We all have to find our own ways of coping at these times…

      Helen’s relationship with the hawk is so captivating as a means of easing the gap left by her father and as a focal point to help her pull through. A great healing outlet as you say.

      I loved this book, Bellezza, but it’s one for the right moment – not a book to read if you’re feeling a bit fragile.

      Reply
  10. Guy Savage

    You mentioned how ‘it felt like a drug deal’ buying the bird. Is it illegal?
    BTW I think in grief, there’s nothing better than going out and getting someone to love. Not a human–that leads to trouble, but as in this case, an animal.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh no, it was all perfectly above board as Macdonald was connected to the official falconry club/association! It’s just that she admits the Scottish-quayside scene has the feel of a drugs deal as she takes delivery of the bird from a breeder she hasn’t met before. It’s a great passage.

      There’s something to be said for finding an animal (or in this case a bird) to love in times of grief, a faithful creature that will repay your love and care in spades. It’s so easy to slip into (or become too dependent on) the wrong sort of relationship when you’re on the rebound from a major life event like this. It needs to be a solid one.

      Reply
      1. Guy Savage

        Although this sounds as though it’s a well-written book, I won’t read it because of the blood-sport connection. Ok, so these birds hunt in the wild, I understand that but I’m not a fan of keeping one for sport.

        On another note, if you spoil a pet dog, there is always a positive payoff. If you spoil a human being, you’re screwed.

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          I meant to say yesterday that I didn’t think this would be a book for you (for precisely the reason you’ve mentioned). There are scenes of Mabel in hunting mode and Macdonald doesn’t hold back on the detail.

          On another note though, I’ve been reading What a Carve Up! It’s great…talk about unlikeable characters! We’re posting on 28th December, right?

          Reply
          1. Guy Savage

            Yes the 28th. I had no idea what to expect when I picked this up. My copy is called The Winslow Legacy and I saw that it was also issued under What a Carve Up. I scratched my head at that one as I knew it was the title to the film (which I’ve seen and own a copy of). But now it’s all making sense. This is my favourite Coe so far.

            Reply
              1. Seamus Duggan

                I’m really enjoying What A Carve Up too. I also really enjoyed this review, which felt more intense than usual even before you revealed the personal connection. I often think my love of books partly stems from the early loss of my mother and is in part an attempt to find some meaning in life having fundamentally lost any sense that there was one. I often feel that it changed me so much that I am somehow not myself (if that makes any sense) and that that leaves me open to empathising with all sorts of fictional characters.

                Reply
                1. JacquiWine Post author

                  Thanks so much for your comments, Seamus, and it’s interesting to hear that you could sense the intensity before getting to my closing paragraphs. I guess that’s what I was trying to convey as it’s a truly heartfelt book.

                  I’m so sorry to hear of the early loss of your mother too, life can be terribly tough at times. Your comments, how such an experience can fundamentally change you as a person – yes, they make perfect sense. I’ve no doubt my personality and character altered as a result of those early years: I became more serious, more reflective, definitely more cautious. I think you’re right, books can help us understand life, widen our experience, provide some sense of meaning in the absence of direction elsewhere. I could feel that sense of empathy you mention in your series of Dermot Healy reviews – it came through to me very clearly.

                  On Coe’s Carve Up! – delighted to hear you’re enjoying it, and I’m looking forward to reading your and Guy’s reviews on the 28th.

            1. JacquiWine Post author

              Great – glad to hear you’re enjoying it! Ah, it’s useful to hear of the different titles – I’ll include a note of the US one. I was vaguely aware of the Carve Up film but hadn’t seen it. Looking forward to watching it once I’ve cleared my mind of the book. I’ll probably wait until we’ve posted our reviews.

              Reply
  11. lonesomereadereric

    What an excellent personally moving review! I’m glad you got to reading it though you were understandably trepedatious about the subject. I think this book has touched so many people because it’s such a refreshing way to look at mourning with all the despair and anger that accompanies it. Thanks for sharing, Jacqui.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks so much, Eric. I’ve been surprised by the response to be honest, but it’s been lovely to read the comments today. As you say, so many people seem to have connected to this book in some way, and it’s wonderful to see it getting the recognition it deserves. Macdonald gets the tone just right, doesn’t she? As you say, it’s refreshingly free of the despair and anger that can accompany writing on grief. What a book!

      Reply
  12. evastalker

    Absolutely gorgeous review. Even though I’ve only heard good things about H is for Hawk I hadn’t quite added it to my wishlist, but I will now. I love how you ended your review on a positive quote after sharing your own story, Jacqui – genuinely very moving.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many, many thanks, Eva. I had to end on a positive note, and that quote felt appropriate. I’m glad to hear you liked it.

      If only this book could have counted towards my #TBR20! Never mind, onwards. Seriously though, I’m enjoying the opportunity to raid my TBR, so thank you for providing the catalyst.

      Reply
  13. Claire 'Word by Word'

    I am so glad to hear you found the right time to sink into this one Jacqui, it’s truly an exceptional read and so multi-faceted with the dual narrative she creates in rereading and trying to understand T.H.White’s reluctant memoir.

    I wonder if books like this are of any comfort to those who grieve or best avoided, its difficult to know without indulging it, but I think when someone can articulate their response to something like grief in this way, it resonates in some way that can at least make us realise we are not alone in our grief. I don’t really know, but I think even if the experience is very very different, engaging with it is at least a positive response.

    What a tough road to navigate losing both your parents way too early Jacqui, even if its been a while, the marks left by such an experience run deep I am sure. I hope their loss has been filled with love from elsewhere. :)

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many thanks for your comments, Claire. I knew I’d love this one; it was just a question of finding the right time and frame of mind to focus on it. I’m still in awe of how Macdonald managed to combine the different threads in a way that feels so natural, so engaging.

      On your question, it’s difficult to know isn’t it? Speaking personally though, I wish I’d read something along the lines of H is for Hawk in those weeks and months following my mother’s death. You hit the nail on the head by saying that if nothing else reading a book like Macdonald’s can make us realise that we’re not alone in our grief, others have experienced something similar. Looking back, I think that’s one of the reasons why I found those early months so terribly difficult as none of my close friends or family members of a similar age had lost a parent (never mind two). I didn’t know how to cope with it, how I was supposed to feel. Two weeks after my mother died, a well-intentioned colleague told me I ought to take myself off to a social gathering at work, to ‘get back to normal’. I had no idea what ‘normal’ was anymore. There was no normal, only different.

      My close friends and mother’s family were incredibly supportive, but I’m sure connecting with others in a similar position would have helped me. Reading something like H is for Hawk would have been a step in the right direction.

      Still, many years have gone by since that time, and I’ve been in a much happier place for the last twenty years. Thanks again, Claire.

      Reply
  14. Gemma

    Such a wonderful and thoughtful review, Jacqui. I’m glad that you found the right time to start reading this book – sometimes that can make all the difference when it deals with a subject that’s difficult to read about. I’ve been meaning to read H is for Hawk for a while – I’ve heard such good things – but your review has made me want to pick it up immediately.

    Reply
  15. Max Cairnduff

    Tremendous review Jacqui. It’s curious with grief, how it can ambush us even after years. The book sounds powerful and well written, and not mawkish. A real achievement. I absolutely plan to read this, an exception to my general rule about no non-fiction books about coping with grief (I just can’t face them even though it’s some time now since I lost my own dead). Still, something about this doesn’t deter me the way say Didion’s Year of Magical Thinking does.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many, many thanks, Max. It is a very unusual book (possibly unique) in terms of how Macdonald manages to convey her feelings following the loss of her father. She does it in such a way that feels completely honest and true, but without the despair or sorrow that seems to mire ‘grief memoirs.’ (I dislike that term, and this certainly isn’t one of those grief memoirs, but you know what I mean by that description I’m sure.) Her relationship with Mabel is so captivating, as is her link with nature and the landscape in general, and these elements just lift the book.

      I’m so sorry to hear of your own loss and hope you gain something from the experience of reading this book. I’m confident you will. Like you, I’ve avoided other non-fiction on coping with grief, but had H is for Hawk been around at the time, I’ve no doubt I would have tried it. That’s down to its distinctive approach and tone which set it apart from the norm. Oddly enough though, the only other grief-related non-fiction I own is Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking. I think it’ll be a very different book to H is for Hawk, possibly too traumatic for me still, but we’ll see. I’ll be reading Run River and Play (alongside Emma) before then.

      One other thought on grief: there’s some beautiful and insightful writing on grief in Javier Marias’s novel The Infatuations – I pulled another quote that spoke to me for my review. I’d love you to try him sometime. Maybe not The Infatuations, but A Heart So White – a wonderful book.

      Reply
      1. Max Cairnduff

        I think we all have to suffer loss if we live long enough ourselves. Not usually as early as you faced though, which is particularly terrible. I don’t really have any useful words, I’ve never worked out what I’d want anyone to say to me which leaves me unable to say anything to anyone else if that makes any sense, but I do salute you for writing about it.

        Didion’s too good a writer for me to read her on this subject. It’s possible your review will change my view, but I suspect not.

        Marias, everyone says I’ll like him so I’m not sure why he never grabs me. I’ll check out Heart.

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          It does make sense, Max, perfect sense. I’m still unsure as to what to say to friends who lose someone – their grief won’t necessarily reflect my own experience. The important thing I think is to be there for that person, especially when the initial flurry of activity, support and sympathy has passed. That’s when I recall feeling so isolated.

          I doubt I’ll get to Magical next year, maybe 2016. I’m really looking forward to Run River and Play, though. I’m glad my thought on dislocation resonated with you – I’ll claim that for my review of Play!

          I’m tempted to reread Marias’s Heart next year. I read it pre-blog, but it’s a book I’d like to write about.

          Reply
  16. Caroline

    An absolutely wonderful review, Jacqui. So sorry to hear about your losses and so early in life.
    It sounds like a wonderful book but like you I would have to pick the right moment.
    So much patience and so much care goes into taming a hawk. I was wondering if you’ve seen the movie Kes? I wish I hadn’t. It shocked me so much, even though it was a movie.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many, many thanks, Caroline. It’s been lovely to read all the comments this week. As Max said, I think we all have to encounter loss in our lives, but it’s a question of finding a way through.

      Macdonald’s book really does convey how much patience and love goes into training a hawk; she’s so attentive and attuned to Mabel’s gestures and needs.

      Yes, I have seen Kes, although it was many years ago; such a heart-rending film. I’m not sure I could watch it again, not in the near future. A powerful story, very hard-hitting.

      Reply
  17. 1streading

    So many people have loved this book, but your review has finally sold it to me. It’s now on my Christmas list (that doesn’t count as adding to my TBR pile, does it?)

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I’m glad to hear it and hope you won’t be disappointed! No, of course that doesn’t count as adding to your own TBR…I might have to resort to that tactic if and when I get desperate for a new book!

      Reply
  18. poppypeacockpens

    Beautiful review & so brave to share how it resonates with you, which in itself makes it a must read Jacqui… a powerful example of how books don’t just entertain but also heal. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Many thanks, Poppy. Yes, I think it’s one of those books that help you think about life a little differently. A book with the potential to resonate on more than one level.

      Reply
  19. Anokatony

    ‘H is for Hawk’ sounds like an old-fashioned book, but old-fashioned in a good sense. Somehow training these birds helped her cope with her father’s death.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, it is a little old-fashioned but in a good way as you say. Very traditional, and the sections on the heritage of falconry add to that feel.

      On training the hawks – yes, the focus required and the relationship with the hawk helped Macdonald to cope with her father’s death. That’s it exactly.

      Reply
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