Recent Reads – Elaine Dundy, John Le Carré, Cesare Pavese and Winifred Holtby

There are times when I don’t want or feel the need to write a full review of a book I’ve been reading, when I’d just rather experience it without analysing it too much. Nevertheless, there are still things I might want to say about it, even it’s just to capture an overall feeling or response before it disappears into the ether. So, with this in mind, here are a few brief thoughts on four books I’ve read recently – mainly for my own benefit, but some of you might find them of interest too.

The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy (1958)

I really loved this novel of the young, adventurous American innocent abroad. It’s smart, witty and utterly engaging from start to finish, a rare delight.

When we first meet the book’s heroine, the wonderful Sally Jay Gorce, she is walking down a Parisian boulevard on her way to meet her Italian lover when she runs into Larry, an old friend from home in the States. The fact that she’s still wearing last night’s evening dress in the middle of the morning does not go unnoticed by Larry – nor does her hair which has recently been dyed a rather striking shade of pink.

What follows is a series of exploits for Sally Jay as she mixes with the bohemian artists, writers and creative directors of Paris. There are various parties, romantic dilemmas and the occasional encounter with a gendarme or two along the way, all conveyed through Dundy’s sparkling prose.

This is a book which eschews plot in favour of tone and mood. Instead, it’s more about the experience of living, of self-discovery and adventure, of making mistakes and wising up from the consequences. Above all, it’s a pleasure to read. Here are a few of my favourite quotes – the first two are archetypal Sally Jay.

The vehemence of my moral indignation surprised me. Was I beginning to have standards and principles, and, oh dear, scruples? What were they, and what would I do with them, and how much were they going to get in my way? (p. 180)

It’s amazing how right you can sometimes be about a person you don’t know; it’s only the people you do know who confuse you.

While the whole novel is eminently quotable, I couldn’t resist including this final piece from the closing section of the story when Sally Jay returns to New York. Dundy has a wonderful way of describing things, a skill which I hope you can see from the following passage.

We went into a cocktail bar just off Fifth Avenue on Eighth Street. One of those suave, sexy bars, dead dark, with popcorn and air-conditioning and those divine cheese things.

“What’ll you have?” he asked. “Champagne? Have anything. Money’s no object. Look. Wads of it. Ceylon. Can’t spend it fast enough. We photographers are the New Rich.”

We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air. (p. 244)

Finally, for those of you who might be thinking that The Dud Avocado is too ditzy or sugary, let me try to reassure you that it’s not. There are touches of darkness and jeopardy running underneath the surface of some of Sally Jay’s adventures, especially towards the end. Moreover, Dundy’s writing is so sharp and on the money that it elevates the novel into something with real zing. Highly recommended – in retrospect, I actually preferred it to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

Simon has reviewed this book here.

The Spy Who Came into the Cold by John Le Carré (1963)

Another brilliant book that has been languishing on my shelves for far too long.

What can I say about this classic spy novel that hasn’t been said before? Probably not a lot, other than to reiterate that it’s a masterclass in how to tell a complex, gripping story without having to rely on lots on clunky exposition along the way. While the narrative may appear to be rather confusing at first, everything becomes much clearer by the end. Crucially, Le Carré trusts in the intelligence of his readers, knowing that their perseverance will be rewarded as the action draws to a close.

It’s also a book that seems to perfectly capture the political distrust and uncertainty that must have been prevalent during the Cold War years of the early ‘60s – the tense and gritty atmosphere of Berlin is beautifully conveyed.

There was only one light in the checkpoint, a reading lamp with a green shade, but the glow of the arclights, like artificial moonlight, filled the cabin. Darkness had fallen, and with it silence. They spoke as if they were afraid of being overheard. Leamas went to the window and waited. In front of him the road and to either side the Wall, a dirty, ugly thing of breeze blocks and strands of barbed wire, lit with cheap yellow light, like the backdrop for a concentration camp. East and west of the Wall lay the unrestored part of Berlin, a half-world of ruin, drawn in two dimensions, crags of war. (pp. 6-7)

While the first two Smiley novels are good, The Spy Came in from the Cold is in a totally different league. A thoroughly engrossing book from start to finish.

The Beautiful Summer by Cesare Pavese (tr. by W.J. Strachan, 1955)

This is a slightly curious one – not entirely successful for me, but an enjoyable read nonetheless.

Set in 1930s Italy in the heady days of summer, this short novel focuses on the life of Ginia, a rather sheltered sixteen-year-old girl on the cusp of adulthood.

When she meets the more sophisticated, self-assured Amelia, Ginia is quickly drawn into an intriguing milieu of bohemian artists and everything this new culture represents, including some brushes with the opposite sex. It’s not long before Ginia falls in love with Guido, an attractive young painter who responds to her innocence and youth while remaining somewhat emotionally detached. What follows is a fairly painful introduction to the fickle nature of human emotions and the duplicities of the adult world, at least as far as Ginia is concerned.

In short, this is a delicate story of a young girl’s loss of innocence and sexual awakening, themes which usually hold a great deal of appeal for me, especially in translated literature. However, while I really liked the overall mood of this novel and Pavese’s depiction of the conflicted emotions of youth, I wasn’t quite as taken with the writing, some of which felt a bit flat or clunky to me. (The following quote is intended to convey something of the novel’s tone and mood as opposed to the quality of the prose.)

Ginia slept little that night; the bed-clothes seemed a dead weight on her. But her mind ran on many things that became more and more fantastic as the time passed by. She imagined herself alone in the unmade bed in that corner of the studio, listening to Guido moving about on the other side of the curtain, living with him, kissing him and cooking for him. She had no idea where Guido had his meals when he was not in the army. (p. 49)

Overall, I was left wishing that Penguin had commissioned a fresh translation of Pavese’s text instead of running with the original from 1955. Others may have a different view on this, so I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has read the book, particularly in the original Italian. Grant and Max have also written about it here and here.

For a sharper, more insightful take on the loss of a teenager’s innocence, albeit from a male character’s perspective, try Alberto Moravia’s Agostino, also set in the heat of an Italian summer – this time in the early 1940s.

The Crowded Street by Winifred Holtby (1924)

(Don’t worry, my comments on this last novel are going to be relatively brief!)

While I liked this novel, I didn’t love it. It’s a perfectly enjoyable story of Muriel, a young girl struggling to find her place within the confines of a restrictive Edwardian society in a small Yorkshire village, a world where marriage seems to be the only option available to ladies of her class. That said, it lacks some of the bite of other stories I’ve been reading lately, particularly those by women writers from the mid-20th century, a favourite period of literature for me.

The latter stages of the novel are the most interesting, mainly because the advent of WW1 provides new opportunities for women like Muriel, encouraging them to spread their wings by gaining some much-needed independence.

Holtby’s prose is good but not particularly spectacular. That said, I loved this next passage from the end of the book – it really stood out for me.

I used to think of life as a dance, where the girls had to wait for men to ask them, and if nobody came – they still must wait, smiling and hoping and pretending not to mind.

How tragic is that?

The Dud Avocado is published by NYRB Classics, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold and The Beautiful Summer by Penguin, and The Crowded Street by Virago; personal copies.

64 thoughts on “Recent Reads – Elaine Dundy, John Le Carré, Cesare Pavese and Winifred Holtby

  1. kimbofo

    I’ve been tempted to buy the new Virago edition of The Dud Avocado and I think your review might have tipped me over the edge! As for John Le Carre I’m afraid I was put off spy novels for life when I was forced to read this book at school, aged 15 with the Cold War in full swing, and even the superlative movie (which my Other Half must have watched a dozen times) cannot convince me to ever pick up this book again!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Ha! I know exactly what you mean about the horrors of being forced to read a classic text at school as it’s a surefire way of sucking all the enjoyment out of a book. My own personal nemesis was The Mayor of Casterbridge, an experience that put me off Thomas Hardy for much of my adult life. I can watch TV or film adaptations of his work, but the thought of picking up that particular book still fills me with dread!

      As for the Dundy, I think there’s a good chance you’d enjoy it. The writing is smart and witty, and the book as a whole is a lot of fun. I really loved it!

      Reply
      1. kimbofo

        Funny. I did Tess of d’Urbevilles (sp?) at school and it turned me into a lifelong Hardy fan. Having an enthusiastic teacher probably helped.

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          How funny! Yes, I’m sure the teacher’s mindset and approach can make all the difference. Chemistry was my favourite subject at school, mainly because my teacher made the lessons seem so interesting.

          Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, I don’t think I expressed myself very clearly in that summary of the Holtby! I meant to say that her prose is good, but not particularly spectacular. The Crowded Street is a decent, solid story, but it didn’t particularly capture my imagination in a significant way. South Riding is definitely considered to be her best, so I’m sure that would be a more satisfying and involving read. :)

      Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          No worries at all. It was an interesting discussion. I forgot to say that I read Anderby Wold last year and really enjoyed it – in fact, I think I preferred it to The Crowded Street. Hopefully you’ll have something to look forward to there.

          Reply
  2. A Life in Books

    The Dud Avocado soundsa an absolute joy, dark bits and all. I noticed a conversation between you and Claire on Twitter the other day. You’ve both convinced me to add it to the list.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      You know, it’s funny. I had just moved my copy of the Dundy into a small pile of books to give away to friends when Claire started to read it. (I think I had decided that it might be too ditzy or fluffy for me – how wrong can you be!) Anyway, her enthusiastic response on Twitter prompted me to move it back into my TBR (and then to pick it up last week). What a delight it turned out to be, so much sharper and smarter than I had originally anticipated. I’d love to hear what you think of it too.

      Reply
  3. Col

    The Dud Avocado isn’t one I’d heard of before but I’m intrigued enough to add that to my list. Spy Who Came In From Cold is a fantastic book which I recently reread and enjoyed as much second time round ( and if you are inclined to try and get past your early experience of Mayor of Casterbridge I can thoroughly recommend it!) Having said that nothing could entice me to re-read Graham Greene’s The Power and The Glory which was my own School Lit study horror experience!!!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Ha! Everyone has their own personal horror story from school, I’m absolutely convinced of it! I can imagine the Greene being quite hard going at that age, especially given the religious overtones. (I haven’t read it myself, but I’m guessing that it’s one of his Catholic novels.) Anyway, probably not the best introduction to this author for a youngster.

      The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is fantastic, isn’t it? I can totally see it standing up to a re-read as the story is so intricate and absorbing. I love that Le Carre has the confidence to take risks with his storytelling, trusting in the faith and intelligence of the reader to ‘get’ it in the end. The plotting feels supremely confident.

      As for The Dud Avocado, I’ll be interested to hear what you think if you do decide to give it a shot. Let us know how you get on.

      Reply
  4. Claire 'Word by Word'

    The Dud Avocado sounds perfect for a friend of mine, it seems to have quite opposing ratings and views on GR, which could be on account of it being a book which eschews plot in favour of tone and mood as you mention in your review. I think it fits perfectly though with what my friend would enjoy.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, that’s nice to hear. It does feel like a bit of a Marmite book, a love it or hate it thing, as I can imagine some people taking quite a strong dislike to Sally Jay’s manner. I don’t think it’s one for you, Claire — but if you feel it might appeal to your friend, then that’s all to the good. :)

      Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          Good idea. I’ll be interested to hear what you think if you do try it! If you’re in the mood for something fun and zingy, then it might well hit the spot. Plus, as you say, it’ll give you a better feel for its suitability for your friend.

          Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Isn’t it just! No wonder it has stood the test of time so well. Now that I’ve read it, I can see why it’s considered to be one of the best, if not THE best, spy stories ever told. Truly brilliant in every respect.

      The Dud Avocado was a complete change of tone, but rather wonderful in its own unique way.

      Reply
  5. Tredynas Days

    Thanks for linking to my piece on Dundy’s novel. I wasn’t quite as enthusiastic as you, but i did enjoy some of the sparkling (and, yes, it is a bit ditzy) prose. I’m afraid the plot, when it lumbered on to the scene, was a stinker. Great central character though. I’m one of those who actually taught the Spy WCIFTC. Hope I didn’t put off my students – though one told me years later when I asked which A level set text he’d enjoyed most, Great Expectations. Why? ‘It was the shortest’.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      You’re very welcome, Simon. I try to link to recent reviews where possible – and while it’s hard to remember every post, I do recall you it writing about it earlier this year. The plot definitely feels secondary (or even tertiary) to other things here, as it seems to be much more about Sally Jay as a character and the experience of growing up/having adventures/making mistakes etc. ***Slight spoiler alert*** I guess the main thing I took away from the plot was how much of a scumbag Larry turned out to be – what a rat!

      The Le Carre must have been really interesting to teach, plenty to get your teeth into there. I’m sure I would have preferred it to The Mayor of Casterbridge!

      Reply
  6. kaggsysbookishramblings

    What an interesting range of books, Jacqui! I own several unread Holtbys and I think I feel I *should* read her but fear being underwhelmed a bit. No doubt the right time will come for it, and also for Dud Avocado which I also own!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks. It’s probably a fair reflection of my current tastes in reading, with an even spread between books by men and those by women.

      Well, you should definitely give the Dundy a go as it’s an absolute joy from the very beginning. As for your unread Holbys, it’s worth giving at least one of them a try. Maybe South Riding as it’s considered to be her best? It’s not that The Crowded Street is a poor novel – far from it, as it’s actually quite good. It just didn’t grab me quite as much as I’d hoped it would.

      Reply
  7. Jessie

    I LOVED The Dud Avocado and can’t wait to re-read it in the future. You’re so right about it being eminently quotable. I wish it was more well-known than it is, but it does seem to be getting a bit more attention lately. So glad you enjoyed it too, Jacqui!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      It was such a delight. I’m so glad to hear that you enjoyed it, too. In many ways, it felt like an ideal read for the summer – bright and breezy with enough sharpness in the writing to give it that edge. I really loved it. As you say, it does seem to be getting a bit more attention of late, probably as a result of its inclusion in the #VMC40 reissues from Virago. That’s no bad thing, especially if it encourages more people to take a chance on it.

      Reply
  8. Grier

    Great post! I started The Dud Avocado a couple of years ago and rejected it, even giving away my copy of the book. I have since bought another copy after friends have recommended it and will give it another try. It’s interesting that you mention Gentlemen Prefer Blondes as I read it recently and thought it brilliantly done (don’t confuse it with the movie which has it in the wrong time period) and very funny. I am not usually a fan of spy thrillers but did like The Spy Who Came in From the Cold when I read it many years ago. Lastly, I am a Holtby fan although I’ve only read two of her books, South Riding and The Crowded Street, and have three more of her novels TBR. I liked The Crowded Street more than you did but agree that South Riding is better. I like how her characters develop and learn from what happens to them in their lives.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thank you! I’ll be very interested to hear how you get on with The Dud Avocado the second time around. It definitely feels like the type of book where timing and frame of mind are everything. Luckily for me, I managed to pick the *right* moment to give it a try, otherwise I suspect my response to Sally Jay could have been somewhat different.

      As for The Crowded Street, maybe my timing was a little off there as it just ended up getting subsumed by various other things I’ve been reading lately – particularly those wartime stories by Mollie Panter-Downes and an Elizabeth Taylor I may post about at the end of the week. I do agree with you about the character development in her novels, that’s definitely something she does very well. In fact, I really liked the ending of The Crowded Street, particularly the final bit where Muriel gets to say her piece – it was by far my favourite part of the novel!

      Reply
  9. heavenali

    I loved the Dud Avocado and bought a new copy in Shakespeare and Company when I visited Paris last year, to re-read but still haven’t done so. I remember my dad loved John Le Carre but haven’t read any myself. I often wondered if I would like them, I do enjoy spy dramas on TV.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Wonderful! A bookshop in Paris – well, that’s definitely the ideal place to buy a copy of this book if ever there was one. I’m sure you’ll enjoy it just as much second time around, especially with those memories of your trip to fall back on.

      It’s definitely worth considering the Le Carre as it’s so brilliantly constructed and gripping. The atmosphere is wonderful too. One for the dark winter nights, maybe? Or possibly an autumnal evening as the air starts to get a bit nippy.

      Reply
  10. Caroline

    I should write these mi da of round ups more often too as I’m occasionally tired of reviewing books. I’m glad I’ve got The Dud Avocado it sounds so good. You know how I feel about the Pavese. It’s one of my favourite books. I read it in French and Italian.
    I was never tempted to read The Spy … but you make it sound very good. I’ve only read The Constant Gardener and thought his writing was surprisingly good.
    Is it nippy in the UK? We’ve got sweltering 30 again.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      They’re a useful way of trying to catch up with a backlog of reviews, for sure. Even though I’ve never been able to review every book I read. I still have a small clutch of half-written posts on various books that I really ought to tidy up!

      The Dud Avocado is great, and I’m pretty sure you’ll enjoy it. The writing is surprisingly good, so much better than I had originally anticipated. It’s definitely a good book to have at hand if you’re need of something bright and witty.

      Yes, we’ve spoken about the Pavese on Twitter, so I know how much you love it. I really wish Penguin had commissioned a new translation, maybe by someone like Jumpha Lahiri, a writer who appears to be able to convey the subtleties of human emotions very effectively. The existing translation just felt a bit flat to me – so I was left feeling that I probably hadn’t experienced Pavese at his best, if you see what I mean.

      The Spy is brilliant and well worth considering, especially if you liked The Constant Gardener. Oh, it isn’t nippy in the UK quite yet (I was referring to the autumn months to come). It’s still the mid 20s in the South of England right now, but the weekend is looking a little cooler, maybe 19 or 20 C. I hope your cats are doing okay in the heat.

      Reply
      1. Caroline

        Victoria (Litlove) whose suggestions I could always trust recommended The Dud Avocado to me. I’m sure I will like it.
        Pavese writes neo-realism, so maybe it’s not as emotional as one is used to nowadays. I’m really not sure. I just felt his own tragedy in it. I’m a bit scared to reread it and suddenly find out I don’t like it anymore.
        I misunderstood the nippy. Well, it’s hot here. And not cooling down but we’re all doing well as long as it’s not over 30°. We had 39° for over ten days. That was no fun. Maybe we’re getting used to it.

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          Ah, that’s very interesting about Pavese’s style. I think it helps to put the book into a broader perspective — something along the lines of a Vittorio de Sica film, I guess. As you allude to there, it can be a risky decision to revisit a much-loved text, especially if it’s been a while since you last read it. Maybe you could read another of his books instead, that’s if you haven’t read them already?

          No worries about the nippy comment. Funnily enough, it might actually come true over the next few days as my postman has been predicting frosty nights for the forthcoming weekend! Maybe we could send some of that cool air your way just to give you a bit of a respite.

          Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      How funny! That’s a Le Carre I haven’t read, but I loved both the original BBC TV series with Alec Guinness as Smiley and the recent film adaptation. I’m sure the book is terrific too.

      The Dud Avocado is a joy from start to finish, a real treat.

      Reply
  11. Tina

    The only book i love by Holtby is THE CROWDED STREET.I admit her other books are “interesting” and “classic” but “STREET” is my favourite.

    Reply
  12. Max Cairnduff

    The Pavese felt a little flat to me, much as I enjoyed it I don’t see it making my end of year list. A new translation might have helped with that, it’s a fair point.

    That Avocado quote is very good. I hadn’t expected that one to grab my interest, but sadly it has.

    Spy is Le Carre at his best, which of course is very good indeed…

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I just felt there was something missing with the Pavese, something I wasn’t quite getting? Mind you, Caroline’s just made a very interesting comment about the author’s style being a form of neorealism, so maybe I haven’t been thinking about it in the right context. Either way, it would have been nice to see a fresh translation as some of the language felt a little stilted.

      Ha! I’m sorry about The Dud Avocado (not really), but if it’s any consolation I think you’d enjoy it. That quote is wonderful, isn’t it? The whole thing is full of eminently quotable passages. Dundy can certainly write, that’s for sure.

      No need for you to worry about the Holtby, though – I think there are other women writers who are better suited to your tastes!

      Reply
  13. Radz Pandit

    Oooh, I loved that cocktail bar passage in The Dud Avocado. I have this novel in the Virago Modern Classics edition, so definitely intend to bump it up the reading pile!

    Reply
  14. Scott W.

    What an appealing quartet of books here, though I’ve only read the first two (I find it amazing, by the way, that your first commenter was assigned John Le Carré in school). I reviewed The Dud Avocado a few years ago and remember thinking I wasn’t going to like it, but I did. I often think of the expat artist character in it (I can’t recall his name – Jim?) about whom Sally at point defends the abstract value of his essentially living at the expense of the state. I’m reminded of a Japanese clandestine expat I knew in Paris, a painter, whose deportation was stopped when a bunch of us wrote letters emphasizing his contributions as an artist. France let him stay (that ain’t America!).

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine

      That’s a great story about your expat friend from Paris. I’d like to think the UK would do the same, but given the current political climate and the government’s stance on immigration I’m not so sure. And yes, you’re right about that character’s name – it is Jim, or the good painter as Sally Jay describes him!

      Like you, I had kind of decided that I wasn’t going to gel with this book. But then I saw on Twitter that a bookish friend, Claire (whose judgement I trust), was reading it and really enjoying it. So I rescued it from a small pile of books that had been put aside to give away to friends – mostly duplicates or spare copies that others might like. Thank goodness I did, otherwise I would have missed out on the delights of Sally Jay! I’m so glad you enjoyed it too. I’ll definitely take a look at your review. It’s the Bank Holiday weekend over here, so I’m sure I’ll have some time a little later to head over to yours.

      Reply
  15. Izzy

    I’m a bit late for the party but I enjoyed your post so much ! The Pavese has been on my wishlist for some time, along with La Spiaggia (The Beach). I’ll be reading them in a bilingual French/Italian edition, though my Italian is very limited.
    I’m sorry to learn about your aversion for The Mayor of C, which is perhaps my favourite Hardy (Jude is a strong contender though…). Your teacher was an oaf !

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, thank you. I’m glad you enjoyed my post! I envy your ability to read Pavese in another language as I do think the English translation had an impact on my response to that book. It’ll be very interesting to see how you find the bilingual edition. Caroline (above) loved the story when she read it in French and Italian, so that’s definitely a positive sign. Hopefully you’ll enjoy it too.

      And yes, it’s a shame about my poor experience with Thomas Hardy at school as I know he’s an excellent author. Sadly, my English teacher was far from inspirational when it came to encouraging us to engage with the classics, particularly those from the 19th century!

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Marvellous. I’m sure it would stand up to a re-read. And what better way to spend a rainy Bank Holiday than in the company of the wonderful Sally Jay. :)

      Reply
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  19. Guy Savage

    I’ve thought about reading the Dud Avocado but was concerned it might be too breezy, so thanks for that. I read The Spy who came in from the Cold during a ‘spy phase’ and really really liked it. Stunned me a bit if I remember correctly.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Well, the Dundy is breezy, but there’s also a distinct sharpness in the writing which helps to give it that edge. Much to my surprise, I really enjoyed it!

      Reply
  20. hopewellslibraryoflife

    Oh, that last quote! I thought immediately of uber-sheltered (nearly imprisoned!) extremely isolated homeschoolers today. Those who make TV’s Duggar and Bates families look wildly liberal. When one of this class of girls finds the courage to run for it and make her own life it is so rare. The rest stay at home until a man arrives on their doorstep who meets Daddy’s criteria. Sad that nearly 100 years later there are still girls in liberated, secular countries being brought up like this!. Good reviews of all. The Avocado I’ve read about before and might get to eventually.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I just googled the Dugger and Bates families as I hadn’t heard of them before. Oh my goodness… Luckily for Sally Jay, there is a kindhearted uncle in the background who gives her that opportunity for freedom by bankrolling her trip to Paris. As you say, there are many other young girls who never get that chance to carve out a life for themselves before marriage and domestic responsibilities get in the way…

      Reply
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