My books of the year, 2018 – favourites from a year of reading

Regular readers of this blog will probably experience a strong sense of déjà vu when they scan through my list of favourites from 2018, such is the familiar nature of the selection. Several of the authors listed here have already appeared in some of my other best-of-the-year posts, writers like Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym and Dorothy B. Hughes – it’s getting to the point where they’re virtually guaranteed their own dedicated slots! In other words when it comes to reading, I know what I like, and I like what I know.

Still, there are a few *new* names in this year’s line-up, writers like William Trevor, Dorothy Whipple and Brian Moore, all of whom I’d like to revisit in the future.

Anyway, without further ado, here are my favourites from 2018 in order of reading. These are the books I loved, the books that have stayed with me, the ones I’m most likely to recommend to others. I’ve summarised each one in this post, but you can read the full reviews by clicking on the appropriate links.

A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor

What better way to kick off the year than with this early novel by Elizabeth Taylor, a beautifully crafted story of the complications of life, love and family relationships, all set within a sleepy, down-at-heel harbour town a year or so after the end of WW2. It’s a wonderful ensemble piece, packed full of flawed and damaged characters who live in the kind of watchful environment where virtually everyone knows everyone else’s business. Probably my favourite book of the year – fans of Penelope Fitzgerald’s The Bookshop will likely enjoy this.

The Boarding-House by William Trevor

I loved this darkly comic novel set in a South London boarding house in the mid-1960s. Another excellent ensemble piece, this one focusing on the lives and concerns of a disparate group of lost souls, each with their own individual characteristics and personality traits. A wickedly funny tragi-comedy of the highest order, this claims the spot for my boarding-house novel of the year. (That said, I must mention Patrick Hamilton’s Craven House in this context – not a perfect novel by any means but a hugely enjoyable one nonetheless.)

The Expendable Man by Dorothy B. Hughes

A young doctor picks up a dishevelled teenage girl on a deserted highway while driving to a family wedding. What could possibly go wrong? Pretty much everything as it turns out in Hughes’ seriously gripping novel set in 1960s America. There’s a crucial ‘reveal’ at certain point in the story, something that may well cause you to question some of your assumptions and maybe expose a few subconscious prejudices too. A truly excellent book, beautifully written, this proved a big hit with my book group.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Last year Shirley Jackson made my ‘best-of’ list with her gothic masterpiece We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Now she’s back again, this time with The Haunting of Hill House a brilliantly unsettling book that relies more on the characters’ fears, imaginations and terrors than any explicit elements of horror or violence. Hill House itself, with its curious, labyrinthine design and off-kilter angles, is an imposing presence in the novel, a place marked by its complex and ill-fated history. Also central to the story is Eleanor Vance, a rather reclusive, childlike woman in her early thirties who travels to Hill House at the invitation of Dr Montague, an academic with an interest in the paranormal. The way that Jackson illustrates the gradual falling apart of Eleanor’s mind is very effective, encouraging the reader to come to their own conclusions about the young woman’s sanity. An unnerving exploration of a character’s psyche.

Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym

Another sparkling addition to Pym’s oeuvre, Jane and Prudence is a charming story of unrequited love, the blossoming of unlikely relationships, and the day-to-day dramas of village life. Once again, Pym shows her keen eye for a humorous scenario and an interesting personality or two. Her trademark descriptions of food and clothing – hats in particular – are also in evidence. As the story plays out, there are some unexpected developments, one or two of which show that we can find solace and a form of love in the most unlikely of potential partners. Possibly my favourite Pym to date.

Good Evening, Mrs Craven: The Wartime Stories of Mollie Panter-Downes

A wonderful collection of stories featuring ordinary British people – mostly women – trying to cope with the day-to-day realities of life on the Home Front during WW2. We see women trying to accommodate evacuees from the city, making pyjamas for soldiers overseas, or doing their best to maintain some degree of normality around the home in the face of constrained resources. Panter-Downes’ style – understated, perceptive and minutely observed – makes for a subtly powerful effect. She is particularly adept at capturing the range of emotions experienced by her characters, from loneliness and longing to fear and self-pity. Probably my favourite collection of short stories this year, although Maeve Brennan’s The Springs of Affection comes a very close second.

The Cry of the Owl by Patricia Highsmith

A book powered by Highsmith’s trademark interest in decency and morality, The Cry of the Owl appears to start off in traditional psychological thriller territory only to shift towards something a little more existential by the end. The story centres on Robert, a deeply lonely man who finds some comfort from naively observing a girl through her kitchen window as she goes about her domestic routine. What really makes this novel such a compelling read is the seemingly unstoppable chain of events that Robert’s relatively innocent search for solace kicks off. We are left with the sense of how powerless a man can feel when he his actions are judged and misinterpreted by the supposedly upstanding citizens around him, especially when fate intervenes. Highly recommended for lovers of dark and twisted fiction.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carré

What can I say about this classic spy novel that hasn’t been said before? Probably not a lot, other than to reiterate that it’s a masterclass in how to tell a complex, gripping story without having to rely on lots on clunky exposition along the way. While the plot may appear somewhat confusing at first, Le Carré trusts in the intelligence of his readers, knowing their perseverance will be rewarded in the end. The tense and gritty atmosphere of Berlin is beautifully conveyed, perfectly capturing the political distrust and uncertainty that prevailed during the Cold War of the early ‘60s. A thoroughly engrossing book from start to finish.

Someone at a Distance by Dorothy Whipple

My first experience of Whipple’s work but hopefully not my last. The central story is a timeless one, focussing as it does on the systematic destruction of a loving marriage, brought about by a venomous serpent in the Garden of Eden. Whipple captures everything with such skill and attention to detail that it feels so compelling, pushing the reader forward to discover how the narrative will end. In writing Someone at a Distance, she has created a really excellent novel about the fragile nature of love and the lives we build for ourselves. Possibly one for fans of Elizabeth Taylor and Elizabeth Jane Howard.

After Midnight by Imrgard Keun (tr. Anthea Bell)

Deceptively straightforward and engaging on the surface, After Midnight is in fact a very subtle and insightful critique of the Nazi regime, written by an author who experienced the challenges of navigating the system first-hand. A little like The Artificial Silk Girl (also by Keun), the novel is narrated by a seemingly naïve and engaging young woman, Sanna, who turns out to be somewhat sharper than she appears at first sight. A fascinating book, one that provides a real insight into how easily a society can shift such that the unimaginable becomes a reality as a new world order is established. My favourite read in translation this year, although The Burning of The World, a remarkable WW1 memoir by the Hungarian writer Béla Zombory-Moldován, also deserves a mention.

If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin

This is a really remarkable piece of writing, so powerful, passionate and lyrical that it’s hard to do it any kind of justice in a few sentences. The novel is narrated by Tish, a nineteen-year-old black girl who lives with her family in Harlem in the early 1970s. Tish is deeply in love with Fonny, just a regular young black guy except for the fact that he happens to be in jail, accused of a crime he clearly did not commit. It’s a novel shot through with a powerful sense of loss, of missed chances and opportunities, of familial love and familial tensions. The forthcoming film adaptation by Barry Jenkins is pretty wonderful too.

The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne by Brian Moore

This is an achingly sad novel, a tragic tale of grief, delusion and eternal loneliness set amidst the shabby surroundings of a tawdry boarding house in 1950s Belfast. Its focus is Judith Hearne, a plain, unmarried woman in her early forties who finds herself shuttling from one dismal bedsit to another in an effort to find a suitable place to live. When Judith’s dreams of a hopeful future start to unravel, the true nature of her troubled inner life is revealed, characterised as it is by a shameful secret. The humiliation that follows is swift, unambiguous and utterly devastating, but to say any more would spoil the story. This is an outstanding novel, easily in my top three for the year. It’s also beautifully written, a heartbreaking paean to a solitary life without love.

The Girl on the Via Flaminia by Alfred Hayes

This jewel-like novel, my third by Hayes, focuses on Robert, a desperately lonely American soldier who finds himself stationed in Rome in 1944. Robert is hoping to make a simple arrangement with a local girl, Lisa – namely some warmth and company at night in exchange for a few sought-after provisions. But nothing in wartime is ever easy, and in times of unrest and uncertainty even the most straightforward of arrangements can run into complications. Another brilliant, bleak yet beautifully written book, shot through with an aching sense of pain and sadness.

So there we are, another pretty satisfying year of reading for me. I really have read some excellent books in 2018.

All that remains is for me to wish you a very Merry Christmas and all the best for the year ahead – may it be filled with plenty of bookish delights!

63 thoughts on “My books of the year, 2018 – favourites from a year of reading

    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Lovely. I doubt whether I would have discovered Mollie P-D had it not been for the recommendations from other bloggers. It’s nice to know that you enjoyed her too!

      Reply
  1. Lisa Hill

    I’ve only read two of these (Trevor & Moore) but if they are indicative of the quality of the rest of them, then I’m going to wear out my library card over the next year:)
    Thanks for a great year in blogging, I haven’t always commented because I get your posts in my email, but I’ve read every one of them.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, thanks Lisa. That’s very kind of you to say. I’ve struggled to keep up with all the posts flying around the blogosphere this year, but I have been keeping an eye on what you’ve been reading recently. Your post on The Seventh Cross by Anna Seghers is firmly lodged in my memory! One for next year, perhaps. In the meantime, I think you’d love Irmgard Keun – After Midnight and The Artificial Silk Girl are definitely worth a look.

      Reply
  2. A Life in Books

    Pleased to hear that William Trevor has entered your canon, Jacqui! I have the Painter-Downes on my list thanks to you and have finally bought The Haunting of Hill House. Hope your 2019 reading is as enjoyable as 2018’s clearly was.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      You know, it’s funny. I’d read (and really enjoyed) a couple of William Trevor’s short stories many years ago long before I ever discovered the online bookish community, but then he just dropped off my radar for some unknown reason. It’s only in the last 12 months that I’ve *rediscovered* him. Now I’m left wondering why it’s taken me so long to go back…

      I really hope you enjoy Mollie P-D. She’s still criminally undervalued and not very widely known amongst the general reading public. I keep hoping the Backlisted team will find someone to cover her in a future podcast; she so deserves the exposure.

      Reply
  3. Tredynas Days

    Great list, Jacqui. As you know I recently read The Boarding House and marvelled at Trevor’s artistry. Pym is always terrific – think it was last year I read that one. Even longer ago for the le Carré – a classic. All the others look enticing. Happy Christmas and a better New Year

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Simon. I’m actually reading another Pym at the moment, and while it’s not quite in the same league as J&P there’s still much to enjoy. Her insights into the foibles and failings of human nature are always so good.

      Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you, too. I’m looking forward to seeing what catches your eye in 2019. :)

      Reply
  4. Radz Pandit

    Great list, Jacqui! Of these I have read The Expendable Man, Judith Hearne, Cry of the Owl and Spy Who Came in From the Cold, and I agree that they are all excellent.

    I do have the Elizabeth Taylor, Shirley Jackson and Alfred Hayes, so am looking forward to getting to them soon.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      That’s great! I think we have a lot in common there. The Taylor is so good, particularly in terms of characterisation, so I’ll be very interested to see how you get on with it next year. Ditto the Hayes, which really captures the mood of the setting – you’re sure to enjoy it.

      Reply
  5. juliana brina

    You have so many of my favourite authors in this list! Shirley Jackson, Pym, Keun, Baldwin… I also read & loved A View from the Harbour this year. And Someone at a Distance & The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne are on my TBR for 2019! You have a great list here. Merry Christmas, Jacqui! :)

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Juliana. You’re a reader after my own heart! I really hope you enjoy the Whipple and the Moore, although ‘enjoy’ might not be quite the right word for Judith Hearne as her story is pretty devastating. Anyway, I think you’ll appreciate them, if that makes sense.

      Merry Christmas to you, too. Wishing all the very best for the year ahead – I look forward to seeing what you’ll be reading next year.

      Reply
  6. Brian Joseph

    This is a very impressive list. I have only read after Midnight but I would like to get to many of the others, I may get to al least The Haunting of Hill House and and The Spy Who Came in From the Cold this year. Happy reading in 2019!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Brian. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is absolutely brilliant. The first two Smiley novels are good, but this one (number three in the sequence) is in a completely different league. Plus, it can be read as a standalone without any prior knowledge of the other two, so you can dive straight in. The Haunting of Hill House is excellent, too – perfect for Halloween or a dark and stormy night in the depths of winter.

      Happy reading in 2019 to you, too. Wishing you all the very best for the festive season and the year ahead.

      Reply
  7. winstonsdad

    I brought Trevor collected stories the other week had my eye out for a second hand copy for a number of years and found one a truly great writer shame he never quite got the booker he deserved

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, that’s brilliant. I’m glad you managed to find a copy in the end. Definitely worth snapping up. I’d like to read his Last Stories at some point, maybe when it comes out in paperback next year. As you say, it’s a pity he never quite got the recognition he truly deserved despite being shortlisted for the Booker a number of times.

      Reply
  8. Emma

    Great list. I still have some of your reviews in my mailbox. I hope to get to them soon.

    I want to read the Baldwin.
    I know I’ll be reading Pym in 2019 because it’s one of our book club choices.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, I hope you have a ball with Pym, she’s such fun. And the Baldwin is definitely right up your street, I’m sure you’ll appreciate it.

      Wishing you all the best for festive season, Emma. I’ll be interested to see what you pick for your books of the year.

      Reply
      1. Emma

        I’m sure I’ll like both a lot.
        I’ll do my best of the year list early in January. I can still read a fantastic book before yearend ! 😊

        Reply
  9. Caroline

    Wonderful list, Jacqui. And one that cheers me up because this I know I loved as well and those I don’t are mostly already in my piles. So, I’m looking forward to all of them. I just noticed I didn’t read any Elizabeth Taylor this year. I’m having a great end of year though. First the Hayes, then Alice Thomas Ellis, now William Maxwell and there were good ones only I hardly reviewed any.
    I wish 2019 will be another great reading year for you.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Marvellous stuff. I think you have plenty to look forward to there, particularly with Elizabeth Taylor and Alfred Hayes. Maybe you’ll get a chance to read another Taylor early next year as a way of maintaining your good run? It’s funny you should mention Alice Thomas Ellis as I keep seeing her name across the blogosphere. Was she one of Guy’s recommendations or Emma’s? Either way, the name definitely rings a bell. I look forward to seeing what you have to say about her (and William Maxwell, too).

      Thanks for your best wishes for 2019, that’s very kind. I hope you have a lovely Christmas and a Happy New Year – with plenty of time for reading, I hope. I’m looking forward to seeing what catches your eye in 2019.

      Reply
      1. Caroline

        I discovered Alice Thomas Ellis on Guy’s blog but Ali reviewed her recently. I’m sure you saw that review.
        I’m not sure I’ll review her as I don’t review that much this year. But maybe. I wish you a lovely Christmas too and a Happy 2019.

        Reply
  10. Anokatony

    I have read nearly all of William Trevor’s work, but I especially love his early work. ‘The Boarding House’ was one of his great early works. He seemed lighter and happier then.

    Ps. I tried to “LIKE” your article, but my LIKE function isn’t working.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I certainly got the sense that he had a lot of fun writing The Boarding House, a novel shot through with a mischievous brand of humour. I have another of his early novels — The Old Boys — in my TBR. Is that another of your favourites by any chance?

      Reply
      1. Anokatony

        I remember I read and enjoyed The Old Boys as I did all of Trevor’s early work. I got hooked on his stories first with ‘The Ballroom of Romance’ and ‘The Day They Got Drunk on Cake’.

        Reply
  11. heavenali

    What a wonderful list. I have read six of them and they are books I loved too. I am so glad that because of you I have The Lonely passion of Judith Hearne to look forward to. You have read some fabulous books this year, and introduced me to several writers I didn’t know about. Have a wonderful Christmas and happy reading in 2019.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks so much, Ali. I really hope you enjoy Judith Hearne. It’s a brilliant book, and you’ve certainly got the most attractive edition with the NYRB! Craven House is a lot of fun too in spite of its imperfections, a baggy but enjoyable debut that I think you’ll appreciate.

      Thanks so much for all your reviews and recommendations this year – I do enjoy exchanging ideas with you, particularly as we seem to have reasonable similar tastes. I can’t wait to see which books you choose for your own end-of-year round-up!

      Reply
  12. Grier

    I love your list, Jacqui! The Taylor, Pym, Panter-Downes, and Whipple books are among my very favorites. I also rediscovered William Trevor this year but haven’t yet read The Boarding-House. Trevor’s After Rain and A View of the Harbour will be on my Best list this year. I have the Keun and the Moore on my TBR list for next year and several others that you have reviewed. Thank you for a lovely year of book reviews and I hope you have a happy holiday.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Grier – that’s lovely to hear! I’m hoping to read more of William Trevor next year, definitely another of his novels and maybe some short stories too if I have time. After Rain sounds like an excellent collection, so I’ll add it to my wishlist (especially as it’s one of your favourite books of the year). Wishing you all the very best for the festive season and the year ahead. It’s always a pleasure to exchange thoughts and recommendations with you.

      Reply
  13. bookbii

    I think your enthusiasm for these books was plain when you wrote your original reviews, but it’s fascinating to see them all collected together. It sounds like a good reading year. Hill House is one of my favourite recent reads too. Lovely blog, as always Jacqui. Merry Christmas to you :)

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Belinda. It has been a good year on the reading front as I’ve broadly stuck to various tried and trusted favourites. Hill House is terrific, isn’t it? So creepy and unsettling with a palpable sense of foreboding from the start. I hope you have a lovely Christmas too, it definitely feels like time for a break!

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      You’re very welcome Cathy. I think you’d like her a lot. Penguin will be releasing a new edition of The Artificial Silk Girl in April, so it could be a good opportunity to give her a try.

      Reply
  14. 1streading

    A View from the Harbour is wonderful. Also After Midnight (looking forward to reading my final Keun, The Artificial Silk Girl, next year). Very pleased to see you kick start a Brain Moore revival as well!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Ha! That Brian Moore post is shaping up to be one of my most popular posts this year, certainly in terms of hits and enthusiasm for the writer. Hopefully I’ll get a chance to read more of him in the future. As for the Keun, I think you’re going to love that. Doris is such an engaging narrator that it’s hard not to fall for her charms.

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Lady F. It’s been a great year of reading, I can’t deny it. Interesting comparison between Moore and Greene, not one that had occurred to me before – but now that you’ve said it I can see similarities in terms of intensity, particularly with The End of the Affair!

      Reply
  15. Annabel (AnnaBookBel)

    What a wonderful selection. I’ve only read one book on your list – the Le Carre – which is one of my desert island books. I have, however, read a different Shirley Jackson and Alfred Hayes this year – and really want to read the ones you’ve picked here (along with everything else on your list!). Merry Christmas!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks Annabel – Merry Christmas to you, too! The Le Carre would be a great desert island book, certainly one to stand up to multiple reading – all those twists and double crosses for starters! I think you’d really like The Girl in the Via Flaminia – it had that aching sense of hopelessness that Hayes seems to capture so well.

      Reply
  16. Daniela

    This was great, you clearly had a wonderful reading year. I had never heard of After Midnight and your mini-review really sparked my curiosity – especially as Anthea Bell is a great translator. Thank you for this!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, you’re very welcome – I hope you get a chance to read it one day. (It’s currently out of print, but still available on kindle if you have an e-reader.) It felt like a very poignant read, especially in light of Anthea Bell’s passing a few months ago. I agree, she was an excellent translator, a real loss to the literary world.

      Reply
  17. Simon T

    Great list, Jacqui! The three I’ve read (Whipple, Taylor, Jackson) are all books I really love, so I’m pretty sure I’d like the others too – and there are definitely some I’ve jotted down as I’ve seen you review them over the year.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Cheers, Simon! I think you’d love the Dorothy B. Hughes and the Mollie Panter-Downes. Am I right in thinking that you’ve already read One Fine Day? If so, then her wartime stories would be a great choice.

      Wishing you all the best for 2019. I’ll be interested to see what takes your fancy in the year ahead, especially as we seem to have broadly similar tastes!

      Reply
  18. Max Cairnduff

    A fine list as ever Jacqui.

    I think my own Keun reading this year (Child of no Nation) will just miss my end of year list, but the Jackson will definitely be in there.

    High praise to compare the Taylor to The Bookshop. Again, my own Taylor this year past (At Mrs Lippincote’s) will just miss I suspect the end of year slot, but Taylor is a marvel.

    And I really must get to Dorothy B Hughes and more Alfred Hayes…

    Happy New Year!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Max. It’s lovely to hear from you. I’ve missed your posts (and chatting with you in general) over the last few months. Hopefully you’ll get a chance to write a little more now that we’re into the new year?

      It’s great to hear that Hill House has stayed the course to make into your best of list for 2018. Such an unsettling book, it reminded me a little of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. Have you read that? If not, I think you probably should at some point.

      That Keun you’ve read is on my wishlist for the future, largely as a result of your review. Maybe I’ll get it later this year depending on how the next few months go. I do think you’d enjoy the Taylor, especially given the setting. It has something of that small-town community feel that Fitzgerald captures in The Bookshop, plus it’s populated with such a brilliantly drawn selection of characters – I loved it to bits.

      Wishing you all the best for the year ahead, Max. I’m looking forward to seeing which books you select for your 2018 highlights!

      Reply
      1. Max Cairnduff

        Hopefully I’ll manage a little better. The new job is also a change of career so it’s not left the time I’d quite expected initially. Hopefully now I’m bedding in I can juggle that better.

        Hill House deserves a place on the opening paragraph alone. I have read Turn of the Screw (and I’ve seen The Innocents, which is brilliant). Interesting comparison – it also walks that fine line between the paranormal and the simply psychologically abnormal (though there’s a bit more evidence of the paranormal in Hill, but not so much that if it were a real life account it would persuade anyone to change their views).

        Anyway, I’ll try to get my list up soon, and I’ll be interested to see what you read in 2019!

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          That’s good to hear. I hope things begin to get a little easier for you. It’s challenging to change careers, specially in the current climate where so much is uncertain. Anyway, it’s great to see you back. I’ve just read your 2018 highlights post, which is characteristically fab – such an interesting selection of books (and I’m not just saying that to be polite). I’d forgotten about A Quiet Place, so thanks for the reminder.

          Yes, completely agree with your comments on The Turn of the Screw. I think it was that sense of ambiguity, of walking a fine line as you so eloquently put it, that came to mind in the comparison to Hill House. The Innocents is a brilliant film, isn’t it? One of my favourites in the genre, probably because it relies so heavily on the psychological elements as opposed to other tropes of horror.

          Anyway, wishing you all the best for 2019. With any luck I’ll be posting about Barbara Pym, Anita Brooker and another Penelope Fitzgerald before long…

          Reply
  19. Claire 'Word by Word'

    So many great titles on your list Jacqui, I’ve never read a Baldwin, so decided I’ll start with this one, especially if there is a film out. So many reminders of authors and titles that I’d love to get to and more to come in 2019 I know!!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Claire. The Baldwin would be a great choice, particularly as certain elements of it still feel very relevant today. I think he’s probably underrated as an author, and not as widely read as he ought to be in the current political climate. His jazz novel, Another Country, is excellent too. I’d be interested to hear what you think of him!

      Reply

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