Hotel novels – a few of my favourites from the shelves  

This is a post I’ve been meaning to put together for a while, a celebration of my favourite novels set in hotels. There’s something particularly fascinating about this type of location as a vehicle for fiction – a setting that brings together a range of different individuals who wouldn’t normally encounter one another away from the hotel. Naturally, there’s some potential for drama as various guests and members of staff mingle with one another, especially in the communal areas – opportunities the sharp-eyed writer can duly exploit to good effect.

While some guests will be holidaying at the hotels, others may be there for different reasons – travellers on business trips, for instance, or people recovering from illness or some other kind of trauma. Then there are the hotel staff and long-term residents, more permanent fixtures in the hotel’s fabric, so to speak. All have interesting stories to tell, irrespective of their positions. So here are a few of my favourites from the shelves.

Grand Hotel by Vicki Baum (1929 – tr. Basil Creighton)

Perhaps the quintessential hotel novel, this engaging story revolves around the experiences of six central characters as they brush up against one another in this glamorous Berlin setting. There are moments of significant darkness amid the lightness as Baum skilfully weaves her narrative together, moving from one player to another with ease (her sense of characterisation is particularly strong). At the centre of the novel is the idea that sometimes our lives can change direction in surprising ways as we interact with others. We see fragments of these people’s lives as they come and go from the hotel. Some are on their way up and are altered for the better, while others are less fortunate and emerge diminished. A thoroughly captivating gem with an evocative Weimar-era setting.

The Feast by Margaret Kennedy (1950)

Part morality tale, part mystery, part family saga/social comedy, Kennedy’s delightful novel was reissued last year by Faber in a fabulous new edition. This very cleverly constructed story – which takes place at The Pendizack cliffside hotel, Cornwall, in the summer of 1947 – unfolds over the course of a week, culminating in a dramatic picnic ‘feast’, Kennedy draws on an inverted structure, revealing part of her denouement upfront, while omitting crucial details about a fatal disaster. Consequently, the reader is in the dark as to who dies and who survives the tragedy until the novel’s end. What Kennedy does so well here is to weave an immersive story around the perils of the seven deadly sins, which she skilfully incorporates into the loathsome behaviours of her characters – both guests and members of staff alike. A wonderfully engaging book with some serious messages at its heart.

Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner (1984)

Another big hitter here, and one of my favourites in the list. As this perceptive novel opens, Edith Hope – an unmarried writer of romantic fiction – has just been packed off by her respectable, interfering friends to the Hotel du Lac, a rather austere establishment of high repute in the Swiss countryside. Right from the start, it’s clear that Edith has been banished from her sector of society, sent away to reflect on her misdemeanours, to ‘become herself again’ following some undisclosed scandal. (The reason for Edith’s exile is eventually revealed, but not until the last third of the book.) Central to the novel is the question of what kind of life Edith can carve out for herself, a dilemma that throws up various points for debate. Will she return to her solitary existence at home, complete with its small pleasures and its sense of freedom and independence? Or will she agree to compromise, to marry for social acceptability if not love? You’ll have to read the book itself to find out…

Mrs Eckdorf in O’Neill’s Hotel by William Trevor (1969)

We’re in much darker territory here with William Trevor, a writer whose work I’ve been reading steadily over the past four or five years. Mrs Eckdorf is very much of a piece with Trevor’s other novels from the 1970s – sad, somewhat sinister and beautifully observed. The novel’s catalyst is the titular Mrs Eckdorf – a most annoying and invasive woman who has fashioned a career as a photographer, exploiting the lives of unfortunate individuals around the world, their existences touched by devastation. With her nose for tragedy and a potentially lucrative story, Trevor’s protagonist inveigles her way into the Sinnott family, just in time for a landmark birthday celebration for the hotel’s owner, the elderly Mrs Sinnott. Once again, William Trevor proves himself a master of the tragicomedy, crafting a story that marries humour and poignancy in broadly equal measure.

The Hotel by Elizabeth Bowen (1927)

Bowen’s striking debut is a story of unsuitable attachments – more specifically, the subtle power dynamics at play among various privileged guests holidaying at a high-class hotel on the Italian Riviera. The narrative revolves around Sydney Warren, a somewhat remote yet spirited young woman in her early twenties, and the individuals she meets on her trip. In some instances, the characters are gravitating towards one another for convenience and perhaps a vague kind of protection or social acceptability, while in others, there are more underhand motives at play. It all feels incredibly accomplished for a debut, full of little observations on human nature and the social codes that dictate people’s behaviour – there are some particularly wonderful details on hotel etiquette here. If you like Edith Wharton’s ‘society’ novels, The Hotel may well appeal.

Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor (1971)

One of my all-time favourite novels, Mrs Palfrey is a something of a masterpiece, marrying bittersweet humour with a deeply poignant thread. In essence Taylor’s story follows a recently widowed elderly lady, Mrs Palfrey, as she moves into London’s Claremont Hotel. Here she joins a group of long-term residents in similar positions to herself, each one likely to remain there until illness intervenes and a move to a nursing home or hospital can no longer be avoided. This is a beautiful, thought-provoking novel, prompting the reader to consider the emotional and physical challenges of ageing – more specifically, our need to participate in life, the importance of small acts of kindness and the desire to feel valued, irrespective of our age. Taylor’s observations of social situations and the foibles of human nature are spot-on – there are some wonderfully funny moments here amid the poignancy and sadness. An undisputed gem that reveals more on subsequent readings, especially as we grow older ourselves.  

Other honourable mentions include the following books:

  • Rosamond Lehmann’s marvellous The Weather in the Streets (1936), in which the devastation of Olivia and Rollo’s doomed love affair plays out against the backdrop of dark, secluded restaurants and stuffy, sordid hotels;
  • Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky (1949), a powerful, visceral novel set in the squalid towns and desert landscapes of North Africa in the years following the end of the Second World War. As Port and Kit Moresby (Bowles’ troubled protagonists) travel across the stiflingly hot desert, the hotels grow more sordid with each successive move, putting further strain on the couple’s fractured marriage;
  • Finally, there’s Strange Hotel (2020), Eimear McBride’s immersive, enigmatic novel, where inner thoughts and self-reflections are more prominent than narrative and plot.

Do let me know your thoughts if you’ve read any of these books (you can buy most of them here via Bookshop.Org, together with a few other suggestions). Or maybe you have some favourite hotel novels that you’d like to share with others – I’m sure there are many more I’ve yet to discover, so please feel free to mention them below.

PS I’m also planning to do a ‘boarding house’ version of this post at some point, something that will come as no surprise to those who know me well!

74 thoughts on “Hotel novels – a few of my favourites from the shelves  

  1. MarinaSofia

    Just realised I’ve read all of these with the exception of the William Trevor – clearly, I must like hotel novels too! Two that come to mind are Evil under the Sun by Agatha Christie (I probably love the film adaptation even more, unusually!) and Brian Moore’s The Doctor’s Wife, which takes place largely in 2 hotels in France.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Haha! Great minds and all that… Evil Under the Sun is an excellent suggestion. In fact the film is on the iPlayer at moment, so you can indulge your love of it all over again!

      Reply
  2. madamebibilophile

    Wonderful post Jacqui! I’ve read the Brookner, Lehmann and Taylor, and I have the Bowen in the TBR. I nearly got to it as a novella in May but not quite – maybe next year…

    I want to re-read Hotel du Lac as I was in my 20s when I first read it and I think I’d get more from it now.

    I’m hoping to read the Baum for the 1929 Club in October as it sounds such a great read, as do all the others I’ve not read! As you say, hotels are such interesting settings for bringing disparate characters together, at a point of transit.

    Very much looking forward to your boarding house post!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Like you, I first read the Brookner when I was in my twenties and didn’t get a lot out of it at the time due to my age and lack of life experience. I suspect you’ll find it a completely different book now. (That’s certainly how I felt about it when I went back to it in my fifties!) And the Baum is wonderful – an excellent choice for the 1929 Club, which will be upon us before we know it.

      Glad you like the sound of a boarding house post, too. It’s another one I’ve meaning to put together for a while!

      Reply
  3. Jonathan

    I love a good hotel novel too; it’s such a good setting for character-driven stories.

    I’ve read about half of those mentioned and mean to read the other half at some point.

    One other one that immediately springs to mind is Hotel Savoy by Joseph Roth…..well, that and The Shining. :-)

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, so many possibilities for friction over shared facilities such as bathrooms and suchlike, plus those odd conversations that often arise when people from different backgrounds start to mingle in the dining room or lounge…

      Hotel Savoy is a marvellous suggestion! I definitely want to try something by Roth, so that sounds ideal, especially given my fondness for hotels. (And I’d forgotten about The Shining – I’ve never read the book, but the film alone scares me witless! Good call.)

      Reply
  4. A Life in Books

    Lovely post, Jacqui. I remember loving Grand Hotel when I read it way back when. John Irving’s The Hotel New Hampshire comes to mind for me, a very different sort of hotel novel.

    Reply
  5. tmcgohey

    Enticing list, Jacque! Been meaning to read Mrs Palfrey for some time now. I would add J.G. Farrell’s Troubles, set in 1919 Ireland. British officer returns from war to once venerable hotel run by fiancé’s family. Alas, the Majestic is anything but. It’s decline reflects that of British Empire. Think Henry James and Charles Addams collaborating. Wacky and menacing. Vol 1 of Farrell’s Empire Trilogy.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks! A couple of people on Twitter have also mentioned the Farrell, so I really ought to check it out. There’s something very appealing about your description of it, a sense of former glory that has long since faded away. Plus, wacky and menacing sounds right up my street. Many thanks for recommending it!

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, I love the film adaptation of Grand Hotel – it’s high time for a rewatch, I think! And thanks for mentioning A Gentleman in Moscow. I adored that novel when I read it a few years ago, even though I never got around to writing about it at the time (more’s the pity). Such a charming, elegantly crafted story. The way the Count carved out a life for himself within the boundaries of the hotel…it was so clever and beautifully portrayed. A wonderful book.

      Reply
      1. Miss Bates

        Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I loved it too. Everything you said rings true, plus the sweep of history that you get from this one focal point, wonderfully conceived and constructed.

        Reply
  6. penwithlit

    Reblogged this on penwithlit and commented:
    Thanks for that and can I recommend Hotel Savoy by Joseph Roth which I found intriguing on many levels? Of course Grand Hotel was an early film and The Grand Budapest Hotel nodded towards Roth’s patron Stefan Zweig. I’m currently reading Coe’s “Wilder and me” which gives a flavour of being an exile from fascism and antisemitism in Paris hotels in the 30s.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Hotel Savoy keeps coming up in the recommendations (both here and on Twitter), which has got to be a good sign! I love Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, which – as you rightly say – draws on the work of Stefan Zweig. (Another author I’d like to investigate further.) And it’s funny you should mention the Jonathan Coe as there’s a piece in today’s Observer about the plans for a forthcoming film adaptation. Fingers crossed it comes off…

      https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/jun/05/how-the-acclaimed-billy-wilder-tried-and-failed-to-snub-hollywood?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

      Reply
      1. Karen K.

        I also love The Grand Budapest Hotel which inspired me to read Zweig. His novel The Post-OfficeGirl is partly set in an Alpine resort hotel, it’s just wonderful.

        Reply
  7. Nicola Stevenette

    Thank you for your blog which o always find most informative..
    May I suggest The Gentleman of Moscow by Amor Towles
    A charming book set in a hotel in Moscow..highly recommend .

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, thank you, that’s very kind of you to say, and I’m glad you’ve been finding my posts useful. The Towles is a wonderful suggestion, and charming is just the right description. I can’t quite believe that I left it out!

      Reply
  8. kaggsysbookishramblings

    Some really great choices, Jacqui, many of which I’ve also loved! I’d second the suggestion of A Gentleman in Moscow above – I thought it was a wonderful read! :D As for Hotel du Lac, I may revisit this once I’ve started reading Brookner – I think I may try to approach her work chronologically as I do like to watch an author develop!!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Can’t quite believe that I didn’t write about A Gentleman in Moscow when I read it a few years ago! It’s such a great example of a hotel novel, so cleverly crafted and beautifully written. I’ve even hand sold it to several readers in the shop! Oh, well…maybe I’ll revisit it at some point, just for the joy of it.

      Re: Brookner, I would definitely second your plan of reading the novels in order to track her development as a writer – at least for the first two or three to see how you get on. That’s kind of what I’ve been doing over the last 3 or 4 years, at the rate of one Brookner every 6 months. :)

      Reply
  9. Cathy746books

    I have such fond memories of nabbing my Mum’s copy of Hotel du Lac when I was about fifteen and feeling the world of books open up in front of me. I haven’t read that Trevor but am really keen to. Great post.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks, Cathy. I wish I’d felt the same way as you when I first picked up the Brookner in the mid ‘80s, but it took me another 30 years to really connect with that book. (I adore it now of course, but it’s been an interesting journey as they say.) You were lucky to gel with her as a teenager!

      Reply
  10. Karen K.

    Great list! I still haven’t read Hotel du Lac but hope to get to it this year for the European Reading Challenge. From your list I loved Mrs. Palfrey and Grand Hotel, and I’ll be reading The Feast this month for an upcoming book group read, really looking forward to it. I read The Sheltering Sky years ago so I should really reread that one too!

    I’d also recommend Arnold Bennett’s novels — both Imperial Palace and The Grand Babylon Hotel are set in hotels. The Old Wives Tale is also partly set in either a hotel or a boarding house.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks! I’m glad to hear you loved Mrs Palfrey and the Baum – they came to mind immediately when I was scoping out this post. Margaret Kennedy’s The Feast is a great choice for a book group, so fingers crossed you’ll enjoy that too – there’s certainly quite a bit to discuss with it. And Arnold Bennett is a really terrific suggestion! I read The Grand Babylon some years ago and very much enjoyed it – a very entertaining story, IIRC. Imperial Palace, on the other hand, os completely new to me, so I’ll have to check it out. Many thanks!

      Reply
  11. Liz Dexter

    What an excellent selection! I like a boarding house novel best, but I also love reading non-fiction about running hotels and guesthouses (and both about shops). The more detail the better!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Good thought! I think I’d like to read a little hotel-related non-fiction in the future. There must be plenty of interesting stuff to discover…

      Reply
  12. heavenali

    Hotels in novels are great, as are boarding houses, so looking forward to that post. Grand Hotel, Mrs Palfrey and The Feast are probably my favourites here. Two of your list I haven’t read The Sheltering Sky and Strange Hotel, they are on my radar for the future now. There is also The Hotel by Elizabeth Bowen, Troubles by JG Farrell and Room with a View by E M Forster, and probably many more. Some Agatha Christie definitely feature hotels. Such a great setting, so much potential for storytelling.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Strange Hotel is very different from the other novels in this list, much more oblique and enigmatic, so I’ll be interested to see how you get on, should you decide to go for it. And I’m pushing the boundaries somewhat with The Sheltering Sky, but the filthy hotels the Moresbys stay in during their trip are part of the squalid backdrop, hence the novel’s inclusion here.

      The JG Farrell has come up so many times that I’m losing count! And the Forster is another great shout. I only know it through from the film, so it’s high time I read the book. :)

      Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Ah, great choice, Stu. The Miss Marples are my favourites in Christie’s body of work. I think I blazed through them all as a teenager, Bertram’s Hotel included. What treats!

      Reply
  13. Julé Cunningham

    A lovely list Jacqui and some great suggestions, I see the Towles has been championed, so I’ll add one of my favorite Agatha Christie’s, At Bertram’s Hotel, the story of how the place fits into the story is intriguing. So many interesting crime fictions are set in hotels. A slightly offbeat one is The Dead Mountaineer’s Inn by Boris & Arkady Strugatsky, that is one I’ve posted about. And lastly, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford, a book that is extremely popular here and still sells very well indeed.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, I remember your post on the Strugatsky brothers’ novel very well. Sadly, it doesn’t seem readily available at a reasonable price over here, otherwise I’d be snapping it up! The Jamie Ford is completely new to me, so I shall have to take a look. Thanks for recommending it, Jule. It’s always good to hear about something new.

      Reply
      1. Julé Cunningham

        As much as I love Melville House, I do wish they’d keep their books in print for a longer period of time. The Jamie Ford is a wonderful book, based on a real place here, and is a good book group choice.

        Reply
        1. JacquiWine Post author

          Yes, I’m completely with you about Melville House. I had the same issue with Irmgard Keun’s After Midnight before Penguin reissued it a couple of years ago!

          Reply
  14. gertloveday

    Fascinating post. I never quite reslised how many novels are set in hotels. I’ve only read the Elizabeth Taylor and the Anita Brookner. And the Agatha Christie of course.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I think you would enjoy Grand Hotel. It’s so cleverly constructed, and the characters are wonderfully rounded and vivid. A thoroughly absorbing read.

      Reply
  15. Tredynas Days

    Some of my favourites in your list, Jacqui, especially E Taylor. Henry James has some great hotel scenes (not strictly set in hotels, so beyond your remit I suppose). Off the top of my head there’s his story ‘The Pension Beaurepas’, and several grander hotels in ‘Daisy Miller’. His American travellers in Europe tended to stay at such places, enabling him to skewer their naïveté/immorality or whatever else contrasted with the jaded grandeur of France, Italy or wherever.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Ah, thanks for the Henry James recommendations, Simon. That’s really helpful. I’ve only read The Turn of the Screw and The Portrait of a Lady (via audio) so far. Both very enjoyable, so I’ll make a note of your suggestions for the future. The skewering of these characters’ failings definitely appeals…

      Reply
  16. Davida Chazan

    I just loved Hotel du Lac by Brookner! I read it not long after it was released. They made a movie or TV series of it, but… the book (obviously) was better.

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, the TV adaptation is very good (and still available to watch on YouTube, I think). Anna Massey is perfectly cast as Edith, and the supporting cast is excellent too.

      Reply
  17. BookerTalk

    So glad to see two of my favourite hotel books make it to your list – Hotel du Lac (though like you I didn’t understand it when I read it first as a youngster) and Mrs Palfrey. Some of the other suggestions I had have already been mentioned: Troubles, Gentleman in Moscow. One new one for you is An Exquisite Sense of What is Beautiful by David Simons which is set in a famous inn in Japan. Talking of Japanese ‘hotels” we also have Goodbye Tsugumi by Banana Yoshimoto

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Thanks so much for your recommendations, Karen. I’m definitely putting Troubles on my wish list for the future as it just keeps coming up (always a good sign)! The Banana Yoshimoto really appeals too. I’ve been toying with the idea of trying her for quite a while, so a hotel-related novella seems like the perfect starting point. Thanks also for suggesting the David Simons, which is completely new to me – I’ll certainly take a look.

      Reply
  18. Simon T (StuckinaBook)

    What a good idea for a post, Jacqui – and apt for the next episode of Tea or Books?, where we are doing The Feast with another hotel novel, Vita Sackville-West’s Grand Canyon. Another one that comes to mind is Zweig’s Burning Secret.

    Already eagerly awaiting the boarding house post!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Oh, how timely! I shall look forward to listening to that episode, especially as the Sackville-West is unfamiliar to me – thanks for the tip! Zweig’s Burning Secret is a brilliant novella, so well observed. In fact, that might well fit into anther themed post I’ve been thinking about for the future, once the boarding house piece has been written… ;)

      Reply
  19. Jane

    What a great idea for a post Jacqui! It’s like the locked in mystery isn’t it, a range of disparate people coming together with their own stories. The book that immediately came to my mind was Rumer Goddan’s Greengage Summer. Looking forward to Boarding Houses!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Yes, the country-house murder mystery is variation on a similar theme, with lots of potential for hidden motives and longstanding secrets…

      Like J.G. Farrell’s Troubles, The Greengage Summer is another book that keeps coming up. I loved Rumer Godden’s Black Narcissus when I read it last year, so a hotel-themed novel sounds ideal as the next step!

      Reply
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  21. rosemarykaye

    Wonderful post Jacqui, I too love a hotel novel.

    I’ve read Mrs Palfrey, The Weather in the Streets and (entirely thanks to you!) The Feast. Also Hotel du Lac, but like many others here, so long ago that I’m sure I didn’t really get it.

    I see many people have mentioned A Gentleman in Moscow, a suggestion with which I’d certainly agree.

    I also thought of A Breath of French Air, HE Bates’ sequel to The Darling Buds of May, in which the Larkins are so fed up with the rain in Kent that they decamp to a small hotel in Brittany. The novel is terribly non-PC, sometimes quite shockingly so, but it’s also very entertaining. If you can remind yourself that it was written over 60 years ago now, it’s good fun.

    For boarding houses, Balzac’s Pere Goriot (Maison Vauquer) and A House in the Country by Jocelyn Playfair (though I doubt that Cressida, the [IMO] annoying owner, would accept that description). Also The Fortnight in September, in which the Stevens family stays in its usual boarding house at Bognor, and tries not to notice its increasing shabbiness

    And of course I’d have to get a Pym in somewhere – in No Fond Return of Love Dulcie and Viola stay at an awful (& very reminiscent of my own childhood holidays) boarding house, and after their predictably early evening meal, walk along the prom and envy the glamorous couples wining, dining and dancing in the grand hotel.

    And there’s another Pym (title currently eluding me) in which a church party goes on a trip to Rome, with much tutting about the Continentals not having a clue how to make tea….

    Also I’ve just remembered Mary Stewart; Wildfire at Midnight is set on Skye, where the heroine, heartbroken Gianetta (Stewart loved her names!) goes to stay to get over her woe. She soon learns that a ritualistic murder has already taken place on Blaven, and more soon follow. Gianetta is the only hotel guest who can’t be a suspect, as she’s only just arrived. The other guests are well drawn and differentiated. But which one is a murderer? Needless to say, Gianetta has to investigate.

    Looking forward to the boarding house edition!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      What fantastic suggestions, Rosemary – thanks so much! There’s a lot of love for A Gentleman in Moscow, which is lovely to see. A most unusual novel, but absolutely charming and beautifully written too. As I’ve said to one or two other commenters here, I can’t quite believe that I forgot to put it in!

      The Fortnight in September is on my list for the boarding house / guest house piece. It’s such a poignant novel, partly because we sense that everything is about to change, not only for the Stevens family but for Mrs Huggett too. And the Pym is another great suggestion. I think I’ll have to weave that in somehow. IIRC, that’s the novel where Pym herself makes a cameo appearance in the dining room – a lovely ‘meta’ touch, especially for such a modest novelist!

      The Mary Stewart is completely new to me, so I’ll have to take a look at that. It sounds such fun!

      Reply
    2. tmcgohey

      Ah yes, the Maison Vauquer. That opening description is among my favorite passages of any Balzac novel. I like comparing multiple translations just to see how each handles certain details, such as “boarding house smell” and furniture like “rejects of civilization at the Hospital for Incurables.” brilliant!

      Reply
  22. rosemarykaye

    Oh definitely The Greengage Summer!

    Also my husband would like to suggest Patrick White’s Hangover Square.

    And I don’t know how I could have forgotten the Eloise children’s books by Kay Thompson. Eloise is the six year old daughter of a very rich socialite mother who has parked her in a penthouse (overlooking Central Park) at the Plaza Hotel (where Thompson herself actually lived). This may sound sad to us, but Eloise isn’t sad at all – the books, written in verse, are a riot. Eloise, her beloved Nanny, their little dog and Eloise’s pet turtle (!) have a wonderful life. Eloise knows all the staff, and although she frequently causes chaos they are all great friends

    The illustrations by Hilary Knight make these books – they are so detailed, and add so much to the humour.

    Thompson was Judy Garland’s voice coach and godmother to Liza Minnelli, who may have been the model for Eloise.

    I can never resist these rabbit holes. I’ll try to stop now!

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      Haha! I’d forgotten about the Eloise series of children’s books, but that’s a great suggestion. I’ll have to revisit those at some point. Patrick Hamilton is definitely on the list for boarding house novels. In fact, he’s probably essential for that category, the only challenge will be which one to choose! :)

      Reply
      1. rosemarykaye

        Aargh – I thought White was wrong when I typed it – meant to check before I posted, but clearly got distracted…

        Reply
  23. tmcgohey

    Stefan Zweig novella, “Burning Secret,” set in Austrian mountain resort, “darkly compelling tale of seduction, jealously and betrayal …. .”

    Reply
    1. JacquiWine Post author

      I’m kicking myself for not mentioning Zweig in the original post! I read it a few years ago and adored it. Still, I have another potential topic for a future post and it might well fit… :)

      Reply

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